U.S. flag This is the official website of The Village of Indian Hill. Here's how you know.
U.S. flag
This is the official website of The Village of Indian Hill.
Here's how you know.

Rangers Police Department 

About the Rangers

The Indian Hill Rangers have always been a progressive department, having the very first police radios, radar, breathalyzer, and other special equipment. The Rangers have been instrumental in the implementation of many regional programs such as the Regional Narcotics Unit, the Police Intelligence Coordinating Agency, and the Interstate Crime Unit. In 1985 the Indian Hill Police Department became the first Police Department in Ohio and the sixth in the nation to receive National Accreditation.

The Rangers attempt to provide a service which is beyond what one might expect to receive from a police department, including the 24 hour monitoring of residential security systems. Violators of the law should not expect special consideration. All matters are handled in a personal and professional manner.

The Indian Hill Rangers would like to assure the community that it’s law enforcement agency is committed to the provisions of service of the highest quality twenty-four hours each day, and that its policies and procedures are effective, responsive, fair and equitable.

Rangers Contact

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Emergency Number

Call 911

Nonemergency Number

(513) 561-7000

Fax Number

(513) 561-9459 

Address

6525 Drake Road
Cincinnati, Ohio 45243

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Hours

24 hours, 7 days a week

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Forms

Quick Links

Car Break-Ins

We are seeing an increase in car break-ins at our parks. Most seem to be taking place at Camp Dennison Park or at Kugler Mill Soccer Fields. In several cases, car windows have been broken out. It is VERY important to secure any valuables (wallets, electronics, purses etc...) in your trunk or leave them at home. Chances are, the vehicles are being looked in and if valuables are seen, the car is entered. We still recommend locking you car at all times. Do not leave a key hidden on your car (on the tire, under a bumper etc...). If you see anyone or anything that looks suspicious, please call the Ranger's ASAP so that officers can check the area.

Coyote Information

Coyotes in the Community — Please do not call the Rangers if you see or hear a coyote.

It is well known that coyotes live in the community. In fact, coyotes are known to inhabit every county in the State of Ohio. Many times a year, the Rangers receive calls from concerned residents who see or hear a coyote. Coyotes breed during the months of January and February, with a gestation period of about 63 days. In April and May, when the pups are born, coyotes are more visible and vocal, as the adults are hunting for food at all hours of the day. Normally, coyotes are considered nocturnal, hunting at night, but in a secure environment, they will hunt during the day. It is this time of year when we do get calls regarding domestic animal attacks. Coyotes are omnivorous, meaning they will eat what is available to them, such as small mammals (voles, shrews, rabbits, and mice), vegetables, nuts and carrion. Unchecked, they will eat livestock, particularly sheep and chickens.

As a resident, what do I need to know or do to prevent a coyote attack? What does the City do to control the coyote population?

Coyotes are timid around humans. It is rare for a coyote to attack a human. Known attacks to humans are associated with the animal being rabid. Domestic animals should be monitored, especially during the early morning and evening hours. Smaller dogs and cats are more likely to be attacked. Residents should watch their wood line for coyotes. Monitoring the wood line and watching pets is the key to protecting them while they are outside, particularly from dusk to dawn.

Education is the key to understanding these animals. It is strongly recommended that if you see or hear a coyote in your area, to watch your dogs, cats, and livestock. Research coyotes on your own to better understand them. The link below to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Wildlife Division, is a great website to check out. Teach your children about them. As a property owner, do your part to not attract them (keep garbage secured, do not put pet food outside, watch animals outside).

The city’s policy on coyotes is that we do not hunt them. There will be an attempt to destroy confirmed aggressive or nuisance coyotes in a general area. Trapping is not done, as they can be dangerous to other animals and children. It is important to understand that by destroying one or two coyotes does not make your pet safer or eliminate the problem that may be in your area.

Quick Coyote Facts

  • Monogamous– Male and female pair for life
  • Peak breeding is from January thru March
  • Litter size is 1 to 12 pups
  • Young are born April—May and leave den around 3 weeks
  • Dens are dug under uprooted trees, logs or thickets, with an entrance of 1-2 feet across, about 5-15 feet long, terminating with an enlarged chamber. May have several dens and move from one to another
  • Are territorial and very protective of young
  • Very wary, with remarkable sense of smell and exceptional sight

 

Distracted Driving Law

As of April 4, 2023, it is illegal to use or hold a cell phone or electronic device in your hand, lap, or other parts of the body while driving on Ohio roads. If an officer sees a violation, they can pull you over.

 

Fireworks Law

Effective July 1, 2022

Under the new State Law for Fireworks, Indian Hill will allow fireworks on the following days, from 12 noon - 12 midnight:

  • New Years Eve and New Years Day
  • Chinese New Year
  • Cinco de Mayo
  • Memorial Day
  • Juneteenth
  • July 3,4 and 5th and the Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays preceding and following
  • Labor Day weekend
  • Diwali

In general, consumers can discharge fireworks on their own property or on the property of another with that property owners permission.

No person under the age of 18 is permitted to handle or discharge fireworks.

Persons under the age of 18 cannot be within 150 feet of the discharge point.

No person can use fireworks while in possession of or under the influence of any intoxicating liquor, beer or controlled substance.

Flock Safety

The Indian Hill Rangers use Flock Safety technology to capture objective evidence without compromising individual privacy. The Rangers utilize retroactive search to solve crimes after they've occurred. Additionally, the Rangers utilize real time alerting of hotlist vehicles to capture wanted criminals. In an effort to ensure proper usage and guardrails are in place, they have published a transparency portal available to the public.

 

Fraudulent Unemployment Claims

If you are a victim of a Fraudulent Unemployment Claim, please visit the attached website link and file a report with the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services. There is no need to contact the police department for a report unless there are other identity theft related issues as a result of your information being used.

 

Pedestrian Running & Jogging Regulations

With more people walking and running on the roads, we want to remind you of some important safety tips and laws:

Running & Jogging Regulations

§ 72.39  WEARING REFLECTORIZED MATERIAL WHILE JOGGING.

   (A)   Any person who is jogging or running on or alongside the roads or bicycle paths in the City of the Village of Indian Hill during the period beginning ½ hour before sunset and ending ½ hour after sunrise shall wear reflective material on his or her front and back.

   (B)   Such reflective material shall be of such size and characteristics and so maintained as to be visible from all distances within 300 feet to 50 feet from such persons, when such person is directly in front of lawful lower beam of vehicular headlamps.

According to Ohio Revised Code, 4511.50 Walking Along Roadway Where a sidewalk is provided and its use is practicable, pedestrians shall not walk along or upon the adjacent roadway. Where a sidewalk is not available, pedestrians walking along and upon a highway shall walk only on a shoulder, as far as practicable from the edge of the roadway. Where neither sidewalk nor shoulder is available, pedestrians shall walk as near to the outside edge of the roadway and only on the left side of the roadway, facing traffic. Any pedestrian upon a roadway shall yield the right-of-way to all vehicles upon the roadway.

For more information, follow the link below:

 

Rules of the Road

The Rangers would like to take this opportunity to remind everyone of some important safety guidelines that should be followed. For the runners and walkers, it is important to run or walk toward traffic, as much as possible. This allows you to see the traffic closest to you and to react as needed for your safety. If a car approaches you and does not give you room, you should stop and move off the side of the road. It is important to remember that the roads are for vehicular traffic and that a pedestrian must yield the right of way. Avoid running in the dark. When you go out, be sure to let someone know where you are running and when you should be expected to return. If you must run in darkness or low light, always wear reflective clothing. The City of Indian Hill requires that any jogger or runner on or alongside any road or bicycle path, to wear reflective material beginning ½ hour before sunset and ½ hour after sunrise. This material must be visible from the front and the back. Such reflective material shall be of a size and characteristic and so maintained as to be visible from all distances within 300 feet to 50 feet. A violation of this can result in a citation and a possible $95.00 fine.

The Rangers receive numerous calls with regards to bicycle laws and such. The following are the basic answers to many of the questions and concerns presented:

  • Every person operating a bicycle upon a roadway shall ride as near to the right side of the roadway as practical, obeying all traffic rules applicable to vehicles and exercising due care when passing a standing vehicle or one proceeding in the same direction.
  • Persons riding bicycles or motorcycles upon a roadway shall ride not more than two abreast in a single lane, except on paths or parts of roadway set aside for the exclusive use of bicycles or motorcycles.
  • This section does not require a person operating a bicycle to ride at the edge of the roadway when it is unreasonable or unsafe to do so.

It is important to remember that bicycles are considered vehicles and have the same rights to the road, and with that, they must operate under the same laws as a motor vehicle. It is imperative that both motor vehicle and bicycle operators share the responsibility and travel safely together.

Station Drug Box

Effective September 1, 2020, the drug box located in the lobby of the Ranger Station will no longer be available. Local locations accepting unused medications are:

  • Dillonvale Walgreens – 4090 East Galbraith Rd. (Deer Park) (513) 891-2808
  • Jewish Hospital Pharmacy – 4777 East Galbraith Rd. (513) 686-3000
  • Bethesda North Hospital Pharmacy – 10500 Montgomery Rd. (513) 856-1111

3-foot Passing Law

Ohio enacts 3-foot passing law

Bicycle Advocacy, Main Page
December 27, 2016
by Gene Bisbee

A 7-year battle to make Ohio’s roads safer for bicyclists ended earlier this month when the legislature enacted a 3-foot passing bill.

Gov. John Kasich signed the bill into law on Dec. 19. It goes into effect before the end of March 2017.

The law makes Ohio the 30th state (and the District of Columbia) to require that motorists give bicycle riders at least 3 feet of space when passing. (For a breakdown, see “30 states require motorists give bicycles 3 feet or more“)

Of those, three require more room. Pennsylvania requires a 4-foot gap; South Dakota requires 6 feet if the speed is greater than 35 mph; and North Carolina requires 4 feet of space in a no-pass zone, and 2 feet otherwise.

The Ohio Bicycle Federation has been lobbying for a 3-foot passing bill for seven years. Although bills were in the legislature nearly every year, none succeeded.
According to bike federation chair Chuck Smith:
"The passing of House Bill 154 was a team effort in which the Ohio Bicycle Federation received support from all cycling organizations in Ohio and their members. The Ohio Sierra Club also provided great support in this effort. It was everyone contacting their elected representatives which brought this success."

Rep. Mike Sheehy of Toledo was the House bill’s primary sponsor, and Rep. Mike Henne of northern Montgomery County helped move it through the legislature with help from staffer Kevin Arnst.  There also was a companion bill in the Senate.

Smith said the next goal is to educate Ohio motorists about the importance of the new law.

Violators will be guilty of a “minor misdemeanor.” If the offender had been guilty of a another motor vehicle or traffic offense in the previous year, the violator will be guilty of a misdemeanor of the fourth degree. If the offender had been guilty of two or more motor vehicle infractions in the previous year, the violator will be guilty of a misdemeanor in the third degree.

That leaves 20 states, including Washington, with no laws on the books requiring a definitive gap for passing bicyclists. Some suggest motorists pass bicyclists “at a safe distance.”​

Article is from http://www.bikingbis.com/2016/12/27/ohio-enacts-3-foot-passing-law/

Away Reports

If you are planning on going out of town, we recommend filling out and turning in an Away Report. These reports are used in the case of emergency contact should there be a problem at your residence while you are out of town. These reports are available under the forms section of this page.

Fingerprinting

Fingerprinting is available for residents and employees working within Indian Hill. The service is free and available 24/7 at the Ranger Station. The police department does NOT provide printing cards. These must be brought with you along with a valid ID. If you need to be fingerprinted, it is recommended that you call before you arrive, to make sure that an officer will be available to assist you. This service consists of ink printing to a paper card.

Mayor's Court

Indian Hill Mayors Court is conducted at 6525 Drake Rd., in Council Chambers of the Administration Building. For more information of Indian Hill Mayors Court or to pay a ticket online, please visit the link below.

 

Reports

Copies of police reports and accidents are available from the Ranger Station 24/7. It is recommended to call 561-7000 to make sure that the report you are looking for is complete and available for release. Only completed cases are available for release. Cases still under investigation or incomplete will not be released in their entirety. Accident reports generally take 3-5 days to be completed and approved.

Security Surveys

Security Surveys are available to residents who request them. For more information, please see the Crime Prevention section of this page.

Sex Offender Search

The attached link can be used to search the Sex Offender Registry in Hamilton County:

 

Alarm Systems

The Indian Hill Rangers strongly urge residents to use their alarm systems at all times. This is not just for the extended periods of time that you may be away from your home, but anytime you leave, or plan on being home for an extended period of time. Most systems allow the use of the alarm, while the home is occupied.

Understanding your alarm system is very important. If you have questions about your system, have had several false alarms, or the system has not been checked by a technician for over five years, it may be time to contact your alarm company for service.

The Rangers responded to over 1,170 false burglar alarms last year. It is our hope to continue to improve on these numbers each year and to bring awareness to the importance of a reduction in the number of false alarms, especially to repeat residences. False alarms to the same residence can instill a “crying wolf” response from the police. While all alarms are responded to with due diligence, repeat alarms may cause a slowed response from police.

We encourage all residents to understand the ordinances set forth by the Village, as they pertain to alarms. We ask that special attention be made to section 90.08 FALSE ALARMS. This section explains the possible consequences with multiple false alarms within a period of time.

Please understand that the Rangers will do everything to work with a resident who is having multiple false alarms.

Credit Card

Many of us have a credit card...or maybe a few credit cards. In today's world, the use of a stolen or lost credit card takes place countless numbers of times a day. Below are a few tips to help protect yourself from having your credit card information stolen, and to further prevent the chance of Identity Theft.

  1. Never give your credit card account number out over the phone, unless the call was initiated by you.
  2. Do not write your PIN on your credit or debit card.
  3. On charge slips where there are blanks, for tips and such, cross out any blank areas that you do not wish an amount added to.
  4. Save your receipts.
  5. Check your receipts against you monthly statement. If there are any amounts that do not match, or if there are charges you do not recognize, report them to the credit card company immediately.
  6. Make a photo-copy of the front and back of all your credit and debit cards. Store these in a secure place, separate from your other records, to use as a reference in case a card is lost or stolen.
  7. If you are traveling, carry the fewest number of cards that you will need.
  8. Do not lend your card to anyone. Properly store and dispose of receipts properly.
  9. Report a stolen or lost card to the police ASAP. It is important to note that the report needs to be made to the local police department where the card was stolen or lost.
  10. Be aware of possible Identity Theft.

Identity Theft

Identity Theft - Facts and Figures

This page provides information and data on identity theft:

The Federal Trade Commission's Consumer Sentinel Network (CSN) collects information about consumer fraud and identity theft from the FTC and numerous other organizations, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation, U.S. Secret Service, Attorney Generals Offices, and various State and local law enforcement agencies. According to FTC's, Consumer Sentinel Network Data Book for January - December 2013 (2014), the CSN received over 2 million consumer complaints in 2013. Findings from an analysis of those complaints include:

  • Of the complaints received in 2013, identity theft complaints accounted for 14% of all complaints.
  • Government documents/benefits fraud (34%) was the most common form of reported identity theft, followed by credit card fraud (17%), phone or utilities fraud (14%), and bank fraud (8%). Other significant categories of identity theft reported by victims were employment-related fraud (6%) and loan fraud (4%).
  • Forty-one percent of identity theft complainants reported whether they contacted law enforcement. Of those victims, 74% notified a police department and 61% indicated a report was taken.

In 2004, questions were added to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) to provide ongoing estimates of identity theft victimization. For the purposes of the survey, identity theft was defined to include the following three behaviors:

  • unauthorized use or attempted use of existing credit cards
  • unauthorized use or attempted use of other existing accounts such as checking accounts
  • misuse of personal information to obtain new accounts or loans, or to commit other crimes.

The Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) bulletin, Victims of Identity Theft, 2012 (December 2013), presents findings on the prevalence and nature of identity theft from the 2012 Identity Theft Supplement to the NCVS. It details the number and percentage of persons age 16 or older who reported at least one incident of identity theft over the past year. Highlights include:

  • About 7% of persons age 16 or older were victims of identity theft in 2012.
  • The majority of identity theft incidents (85%) involved the fraudulent use of existing account information, such as credit card or bank account information.
  • Victims who had personal information used to open a new account or for other fraudulent purposes were more likely than victims of existing account fraud to experience financial, credit, and relationship problems and severe emotional distress.
  • About 14% of identity theft victims experienced out-of-pocket losses of $1 or more. Of these victims, about half suffered losses of less than $100.„„
  • Over half of identity theft victims who were able to resolve any associated problems did so in a day or less; among victims who had personal information used for fraudulent purposes, 29% spent a month or more resolving problems.

The Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) report, Identity Theft Reported by Households, 2005-2010 (2011), provides statistical information based on experiences of all household members age 12 or older as reported by the head of household. Highlights from Identity Theft Reported by Households, 2005-2010 include the following:

  • In 2010, 7.0% of households in the United States, or about 8.6 million households, had at least one member age 12 or older who experienced one or more types of identity theft victimization.
  • Among households in which at least one member experienced one or more types of identity theft, 64.1% experienced the misuse or attempted misuse of an existing credit card account in 2010.
  • From 2005 to 2010, the percentage of all households with one or more type of identity theft that suffered no direct financial loss increased from 18.5% to 23.7%.

(NCJRS)

Preventing identity theft can be simple

  1. Shred (preferably with crosscut shredder) all of your important papers, including pre- approved credit applications. Shred credit card receipts and other documents that may contain any personal information about you or your family members.
  2. Be careful at ATM’s and when using your credit or debit cards. Be aware of people “shoulder surfing” for account and “pin” numbers.
  3. It is recommended to drop your outgoing mail off at a US mailbox or post office, as opposed to using your home mailbox.
  4. Put a password on all accounts and do not use your mother’s maiden name.
  5. Check your credit report at least once a year. You get one free credit report per year. To obtain yours, visit www.annualcreditreport.com or call (877) 322-8228.

If you become a victim of Identity Theft, here’s what to do….

  1. Contact the three major Credit Bureaus
    1. Equifax – (800) 525-6285
    2. Experian – (888) 397-3742
    3. TransUnion – (800) 680-7289
  2. File a report with the police department. Keep in mind that this report may not always be able to be taken by the local police department, depending on where the offense takes place.
  3. Be sure to contact the credit card company immediately, to cancel the account and to monitor for future activity.

Scams

Credit card SCAMS have been a huge problem for people when it comes to identity theft and misuse of a credit card. There are dozens of different SCAMS out there, all in an attempt to take advantage of you, and to gain money/property from your confusion.

This page will be used to help inform you of the current SCAMS that are going around. These are not necessarily taking place in the Village, but we want you to be informed on what to look out for.

There are a couple of important things to remember. Your credit card company will never contact you through e-mail to verify your information. If you get an e-mail to verify an account or personal information, the link that you click on in that e-mail may open yourself up to information being stolen. If you have a credit card in the name of the company supposedly looking for information, you should contact them on the phone using the phone number on the back of your card so that they can track the e-mails.

If you get a phone call, you need to remember again, that your credit card company already has your information on file. If someone calls to “verify” your information, you should hang up and call the appropriate credit card company. Unless you initiate the phone call with the credit card company, NEVER GIVE OUT YOUR PERSONAL INFORMATION!!!

If it sounds to good to be true, it probably is!! Take a step back and evaluate the whole situation before you act.

Below are some alerts that the Ranger’s are made aware of from other departments. Unless noted otherwise, these are not current SCAMS being reported within Indian Hill. This is meant to be information only!! If there are ever any questions about a possible scam, please call the Ranger’s ASAP.

 

Security Survey

Scheduling for the surveys can be done by calling the police department or emailing [email protected].

Surveys will take place on working days available to Ptl. Ramsey (Other arrangements may be available upon request). Areas covered include an interior and exterior questionnaire, visual inspection of home exterior (weather permitting) and home interior upon request. Understanding your alarm and alarm procedures, and updating any changes in contact information to ensure proper notification in the event of an emergency.

Common Ordinance Questions

Below are some common ordinances that residents have questions about:

§ 91.05 RESTRAINT OF RESTRICTED DOG OR CAT.

It shall be unlawful for any person owning or harboring a restricted dog or cat to permit such a dog or cat to be outside of any enclosure at any time except when that dog or cat is restrained by a leash.

('80 Code, § 90.05) (Ord. 20-78, passed 10-30-78) Penalty, see § 91.99

§ 77.10 LITTER OR FOREIGN MATTER FROM CONSTRUCTION SITES ON PUBLIC ROADWAYS, STREETS OR OTHER PUBLIC PLACES.

(A) No person shall operate on any public roadway, street or other public place a vehicle with mud , dirt, sticky substances, litter or foreign matter on its wheels or other parts if the operation results in the depositing or tracking of such mud , dirt, substances, litter or foreign matter on any roadway, street or other public place. No person being owner of real property and/or a prime contractor in charge of a construction site shall maintain such property or construction site so that vehicles upon the property or construction site pick up mud , dirt, sticky substances, litter or foreign matter on the wheels or other parts and deposit or track the mud , dirt, sticky substances, litter or foreign matter onto any public roadway, street or other public place.

(B) No person shall drive or move any truck or other vehicle within the village unless such vehicle is so constructed and loaded as to prevent any load, contents or litter from being thrown or deposited upon any public roadway, street or other public place. No person being the owner, driver or other person in charge of a vehicle hauling excavated material, construction or building materials, or other materials within the village shall permit any part of such material to fall or drop or be blown therefrom on a public roadway, street or other public place. When a vehicle carries trash, sawdust, ashes, cinders, sand, earth, lime, manure or other substance liable to be blown away, the owner, driver and/any other person in charge thereof shall, before driving or operating it on any public roadway, street or other public place, cause such substance or substances to be completely covered with a canvas or other substantial covering in such manner that the same cannot fall or be blown from such vehicle.

(C) No person shall operate any truck or other vehicle, including those used for hauling earth- moving and any other equipment, or that has accumulated any mud , dirt, litter or any other debris that is liable to be blown or otherwise dislodged during operation onto any roadway, street or other public place. The owner, driver or person in charge of such truck or other vehicle shall, before operating it on any roadway, street or other public place, cause such accumulated mud , dirt, litter or debris to be removed or shall cover such portions of the truck or vehicle with a canvas or other substantial covering so that such accumulated material cannot be blown or otherwise dislodged during operation onto any roadway, street or other public place.

(D) Where mud , dirt, sticky substances, litter or foreign matter has been tracked or deposited on any roadway, street or other public place in violation of divisions (A), (B) or (C) of this section of this code, the City Manager is authorized to cause such mud , dirt, substances, litter or foreign matter to be cleaned from such roadway, street or other public place and to charge the cost thereof to person or persons responsible. The term RESPONSIBLE PERSON as used in this section shall mean the driver of the vehicle which deposited or tracked the mud , dirt, substances, litter or foreign matter on the street and/or the driver's employer or the owner of the real property and/or prime contractor in charge of a construction site from where the deposited or tracked mud , dirt, substances, litter or foreign matter on the roadway, street or other public place originated. Each day that a violation of divisions (A), (B) or (C) of this section is found shall be a separate offense.

(Ord. 06-94, passed 4-25-94) Penalty, see § 77.99

§ 94.11 LIMITATIONS ON USE OF CONSTRUCTION TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT.

(A) Use of construction tools and equipment. Except as provided in division (C) through (G) of this section, no person may use construction tools and equipment except between 7:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and between 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. on Saturdays; provided, however, that such tools and equipment shall not be used at any time on the following federal holidays: New Year's Day, Memorial Day, Fourth of July, Labor Day, Thanksgiving, and Christmas.

(B) Emergencies. The limitations stated in division (A) of this section shall not apply in any situation which requires heavy equipment or other tools in emergencies to assist or avoid a problem related to health or to safety of persons or property, or to sewer, water, power, utility, or telephone interruptions.

(C) Work by public agencies. The limitations stated in division (A) of this section may be waived by the City Manager for work undertaken by any public body or agency for the benefit of the public. The City Manager may attach to any such waiver all conditions he or she deems necessary to protect the public health, safety, or welfare.

(D) Farming and other agricultural activities. The prohibitions stated in division (A) of this section shall not be construed to apply to any bona fide farming or agricultural activity.

(E) Routine landscaping and other yard and golf course maintenance activities. The prohibitions stated in division (A) of this section shall not be construed to apply to any routine landscaping and other yard and golf course maintenance activities, including snow removal, performed either by a resident or property owner, or under a maintenance agreement with a resident or property owner.

(F) Use of power tools for interior work by resident or property owner. The prohibitions stated in division (A) of this section shall not be construed to apply to the use of power tools for home repairs and/or hobbies by a resident or property owner within the interior of their residence, garage, or other accessory structure.

(G) Waiver.

(1) The prohibitions stated in division (A) of this section may be waived by the City Manager in the case of exceptional circumstances; provided, however, that no such waiver shall be granted unless the City Manager finds that:

(a) The party seeking the waiver will suffer a significant hardship unless the waiver is granted; and

(b) The granting of a waiver will not cause a substantial or undue adverse impact upon adjacent property or upon the public health, safety and welfare.

(2) The City Manager may attach to such waiver all conditions he or she deems necessary to protect the public health, safety or welfare.

(Ord. 03-06, passed 1-30-06) Penalty, see § 94.99

§ 112.07 DUTY OF SOLICITORS.

(A) It shall be the duty of every solicitor upon going onto any premises in the municipality upon which a residence as herein defined is located, to first examine the notice provided for in this chapter, if any is attached, and be governed by the statement contained on any notice. If the notice states "Only Solicitors Registered in Indian Hill Invited," then the solicitor not possessing a valid certificate of registration as herein provided shall immediately and peacefully depart from the premises, and if the notice states "No Solicitors Invited," then the solicitor, whether registered or not, shall immediately and peacefully depart from the premises.

(B) Premises owners, occupiers, residents and tenants also have the right to notify the Police, in writing, that solicitors are not invited upon that premises or property. The village shall compile and maintain a current list of those premises owners, occupiers, residents and tenants who have done so. The custodian of the list must update the list once every six months so that the list is kept up-to-date and so that any property on the list whose resident(s) or tenant(s) no longer reside on the property are removed from the list. It shall be the duty of every solicitor to obtain that list prior to soliciting in the village. It shall also be the duty of every solicitor to honor the wishes of those premises owners, occupiers, residents and/or tenants by not entering the property and/or premises contained on that list.

(C) Any solicitor who has gained entrance to any residence, whether invited or not, shall immediately and peacefully depart from the premises when requested to do so by the occupant.

(Ord. 08-01, passed 5-21-01; Am. Ord. 08-12., passed 8-27-12) Penalty, see § 112.99

Juvenile Drivers and Seat Belt Laws

Drivers License and Child Restraint Laws

(Effective 4/6/07)

UNDER 16 (4507.05 F1)

Permit and ID card in possession

Accompanied by a sober and licensed—Parent, Guardian, Instructor, Person acting as parent

RESTRICTIONS- Midnight—6AM prohibited without above

All occupants must be properly restrained

 

OVER 16 (prior to having permit for 6 months) (4507.05 F2)

Permit and ID card in possession

Accompanied by sober and licensed 21 year old

RESTRICTIONS– Midnight—6AM prohibited without Parent or Guardian

All occupants in a seat and properly restrained

Restrictions for 16 year olds with a permit for longer than 6 months

 

Under 17 years of age (4507.071 B1a)

Midnight to 6 AM prohibited without a parent, guardian, unless school function or work with documentation in possession

Only 1 (one) non-family passenger unless accompanied by parent/guardian (4507.071 B4)

Over 17 years of age (until 18th birthday) (4507.071 B1b)

1 AM to 5 AM prohibited without a parent, guardian unless school function or work with documentation in possession

 

Traffic violation penalties (4507.071D2)

Under 16 and a half years of age, prior moving violation date during 1st 6 months of operators license, must drive with parent/guardian for 6 months.

16 and a half to 17 years of age, prior moving violation date during 1st 6 months of operators license, must drive with parent/guardian until 17.

 

Seat Belts

In Ohio every driver and front seat passenger must wear a seat belt.

A holder of a probationary license can only operate a vehicle with all occupants in a seat (not sharing) and must be restrained by a restraining device originally installed by the vehicle manufacturer. (4507.071 E)

Children who are 4, 5, 6 and 7 years of age, weigh more than 40 pounds and are less than 4 feet 9 inches tall, must be secured in a booster seat and use a seat belt, whenever they ride in a motor vehicle.

Children under 16 and over 4 must be restrained in a seat belt, or child restrain if applicable. (4511.81 C)

Children less than 4 years of age and or less than 40 lbs. must be in an approved child restraining device. (4511.81 A)

The new law is effective as of October 7, 2009.

Ohio Texting and Use of Devices In a Motor Vehicle

As of January 1, 2013, it is illegal for anyone to use a handheld communication device to write, send or read a text-based communication while operating a motor vehicle. If a driver is under the age of 18, it is illegal to text, use cell phone or to use any other handheld electronical device while operating a motor vehicle. Below is the exact wording of the law, per the Ohio Revised Code.

Driving While Texting

4511.204 [Effective 8/31/2012] Driving while texting.

(A) No person shall drive a motor vehicle, trackless trolley, or streetcar on any street, highway, or property open to the public for vehicular traffic while using a handheld electronic wireless communications device to write, send, or read a text-based communication.

(B) Division (A) of this section does not apply to any of the following:

(1) A person using a handheld electronic wireless communications device in that manner for emergency purposes, including an emergency contact with a law enforcement agency, hospital or health care provider, fire department, or other similar emergency agency or entity;

(2) A person driving a public safety vehicle who uses a handheld electronic wireless communications device in that manner in the course of the person’s duties;

(3) A person using a handheld electronic wireless communications device in that manner whose motor vehicle is in a stationary position and who is outside a lane of travel;

(4) A person reading, selecting, or entering a name or telephone number in a handheld electronic wireless communications device for the purpose of making or receiving a telephone call;

(5) A person receiving wireless messages on a device regarding the operation or navigation of a motor vehicle; safety-related information, including emergency, traffic, or weather alerts; or data used primarily by the motor vehicle;

(6) A person receiving wireless messages via radio waves;

(7) A person using a device for navigation purposes;

(8) A person conducting wireless interpersonal communication with a device that does not require manually entering letters, numbers, or symbols or reading text messages, except to activate, deactivate, or initiate the device or a feature or function of the device;

(9) A person operating a commercial truck while using a mobile data terminal that transmits and receives data;

(10) A person using a handheld electronic wireless communications device in conjunction with a voice-operated or hands-free device feature or function of the vehicle.

(C) Notwithstanding any provision of law to the contrary, no law enforcement officer shall cause an operator of an automobile being operated on any street or highway to stop the automobile for the sole purpose of determining whether a violation of division (A) of this section has been or is being committed or for the sole purpose of issuing a ticket, citation, or summons for a violation of that nature or causing the arrest of or commencing a prosecution of a person for a violation of that nature, and no law enforcement officer shall view the interior or visually inspect any automobile being operated on any street or highway for the sole purpose of determining whether a violation of that nature has been or is being committed.

(D) Whoever violates division (A) of this section is guilty of a minor misdemeanor.

(E) This section shall not be construed as invalidating, preempting, or superseding a substantially equivalent municipal ordinance that prescribes penalties for violations of that ordinance that are greater than the penalties prescribed in this section for violations of this section.

(F) As used in this section:

(1) “Electronic wireless communications device” includes any of the following:

(a) A wireless telephone;

(b) A text-messaging device;

(c) A personal digital assistant;

(d) A computer, including a laptop computer and a computer tablet;

(e) Any other substantially similar wireless device that is designed or used to communicate text.

(2) “Voice-operated or hands-free device” means a device that allows the user to vocally compose or send, or to listen to a text-based communication without the use of either hand except to activate or deactivate a feature or function.

(3) “Write, send, or read a text-based communication” means to manually write or send, or read a text-based communication using an electronic wireless communications device, including manually writing or sending, or reading communications referred to as text messages, instant messages, or electronic mail.

Added by 129th General Assembly File No. 106, HB 99, § 1, eff. 8/31/2012.

See 129th General Assembly File No. 106, HB 99, §3.

Use Of Devices By Persons Under 18 Years Of Age

4511.205 [Effective 8/31/2012] Use of devices by persons under 18 years of age.

(A) No holder of a temporary instruction permit who has not attained the age of eighteen years and no holder of a probationary driver’s license shall drive a motor vehicle on any street, highway, or property used by the public for purposes of vehicular traffic or parking while using in any manner an electronic wireless communications device.

(B) Division (A) of this section does not apply to either of the following:

(1) A person using an electronic wireless communications device for emergency purposes, including an emergency contact with a law enforcement agency, hospital or health care provider, fire department, or other similar emergency agency or entity;

(2) A person using an electronic wireless communications device whose motor vehicle is in a stationary position and the motor vehicle is outside a lane of travel;

(3) A person using a navigation device in a voice-operated or hands-free manner who does not manipulate the device while driving.

(C)(1) Except as provided in division©(2) of this section, whoever violates division (A) of this section shall be fined one hundred fifty dollars. In addition, the court shall impose a class seven suspension of the offender’s driver’s license or permit for a definite period of sixty days.

(2) If the offender previously has been convicted of a violation of this section, whoever violates this section shall be fined three hundred dollars. In addition, the court shall impose a class seven suspension of the offender’s driver’s license or permit for a definite period of one year.

(D) As used in this section, “electronic wireless communications device” includes any of the following:

(1) A wireless telephone;

(2) A personal digital assistant;

(3) A computer, including a laptop computer and a computer tablet;

(4) A text-messaging device;

(5) Any other substantially similar electronic wireless device that is designed or used to communicate via voice, image, or written word.

Added by 129th General Assembly File No. 106, HB 99, § 1, eff. 8/31/2012.

See 129th General Assembly File No. 106, HB 99, §3.

Underage Drinking and Parental Consequences

Underage Drinking
Alcohol use by persons under age 21 years is a major public health problem. Alcohol is the most commonly used and abused drug among youth in the United States, more than tobacco and illicit drugs, and is responsible for more than 4,300 annual deaths among underage youth. Although drinking by persons under the age of 21 is illegal, people aged 12 to 20 years drink 11% of all alcohol consumed in the United States. More than 90% of this alcohol is consumed in the form of binge drinks. On average, underage drinkers consume more drinks per drinking occasion than adult drinkers. In 2010, there were approximately 189,000 emergency room visits by persons under age 21 for injuries and other conditions linked to alcohol.

Drinking Levels among Youth
The 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey found that among high school students, during the past 30 days

  • 35% drank some amount of alcohol.
  • 21% binge drank.
  • 10% drove after drinking alcohol.
  • 22% rode with a driver who had been drinking alcohol.

Other national surveys

  • In 2012 the National Survey on Drug Use and Health reported that 24% of youth aged 12 to 20 years drink alcohol and 15% reported binge drinking.
  • In 2013, the Monitoring the Future Survey reported that 28% of 8th graders and 68% of 12th graders had tried alcohol, and 10% of 8th graders and 39% of 12th graders drank during the past month.

(Statistics from the CDC)

2012 Alcohol-Impaired Driving Fatality Data in Ohio

Total Alcohol-Impaired Driving Fatalities 385

Under 21 Alcohol-Impaired Driving Fatalities 39

2012 Alcohol-Impaired Driving Fatalities per 100,000 Population

Alcohol-Impaired Driving Fatalities per 100K population 3.3

Under 21 Alcohol-Impaired Driving Fatalities per 100K population 1.2

2002-2012 % Change in Alcohol-Impaired Driving Fatalities per 100K Pop

10-year Change in Alcohol-Impaired Driving Fatalities per 100K pop -18.7

10-year Change in Under 21 Alcohol-Impaired Driving Fatalities per 100K pop -32.2

Percent of Alcohol-Impaired Driving Fatalities Involving high BAC drivers (.15+)*

BAC=.15 + 77.4

Percent of Drivers in Fatal Crashes Involving Repeat Offenders

BAC .08-.14 19.4

BAC .15+ 80.6

2011 and 2012 12-20 Year Old Alcohol Consumption

Past Month Alcohol Consumption 26.4

Binge Drinking in Past 30-days 17.2

2016 Arrest Data

Under 18: Driving under the influence 62

Total: Driving under the influence 35629

Under 18: Liquor laws 1211

Total: Liquor laws 8254

Under 18: Drunkenness 31

Total: Drunkenness 2986

Alcohol-Impaired Driving Fatality Data Source: NHTSA/FARS, 12/13

*Among drivers with a known alcohol test result

*Youth Consumption Data Source: SAMHSA, Office of Applied Studies, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2011 and 2012

*Arrest Data Source: 2012 FBI Uniform Crime Report (Tables 38 and 69)

**Drunkenness is not considered a crime in some states; therefore, the figures may vary widely from state to state

*Limited, incomplete, or no data were reported by the Alabama, District of Columbia, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, and New York in the 2012 Uniform Crime Report. Data should be used with caution and should not be compared to other states or previous year data.

Note: Because the number of agencies submitting arrest data varies from year to year, users are cautioned about making direct comparisons between 2012 arrest totals and those published in previous years' editions of Crime in the United States. Further, arrest figures may vary widely from state to state because some Part II crimes of the Uniform Crime Report are not considered crimes in some states.

What Is Underage Drinking?
In many states, the age of majority (when a person becomes an adult) is at 18 years old. However, drinking laws don’t allow a person to lawfully consume alcohol until they are 21 years old. Thus, underage drinking can occur even if a person is already legally considered an adult.

Underage drinking is considered a major problem in the U.S., and is linked with several health concerns and safe driving concerns. Thus, many underage drinking laws also require schools and educational organizations to institute informational courses on the dangers of underage drinking.

In some states, underage drinking is allowed, so long as it occurs under a parent’s supervision, and at their own home. However, some states hold parents liable if they or their child violates underage drinking provisions, and public underage drinking is never allowed.

What Are Some Consequences of Underage Drinking?
The consequences of underage drinking can often be severe. While most juvenile laws aim at rehabilitating rather than punishing minors, underage drinking is still strictly punished in comparison to other juvenile crimes.

Some penalties for underage drinking may include:

Criminal fines

Mandatory community service

Required counseling classes

In some cases, possible jail time

Suspension of driver’s license privileges

In addition, underage drinking can also have negative consequences in other areas of the person’s life, such as driver’s insurance policies. Depending on school policies, underage drinking can also have negative effects in some areas of school life, such as the person’s ability to participate in sports, certain ceremonies, or denied college scholarships.

Can Parents Be Held Liable for Their Child’s Underage Drinking?
This depends- as mentioned, some states actually allow underage drinking if it occurs under a parent’s supervision, within the boundaries of their own home.

However, many states impose criminal charges on adults who engage in serving or selling alcohol to minors. Also, an adult can be charged with a crime if they knowingly allow minors to consume alcohol while on their property. Even worse, if the minor is hurt or injured as a result of drinking at the adult’s home, the responsible adult(s) may face criminal or civil charges.

Lastly, some jurisdictions are so strict that they impose penalties on adults if underage drinking occurs at their house, even if the parent isn’t home or aware that there is underage drinking going on.

Weather and Storm Preparedness

As you know, Indian Hill and this part of the country are not immune from severe weather. Over the past couple of years, our area has been hit by storms that resulted in lengthy power outages and property damage. These storms have come in the form of snow/ice and even a hurricane.
When severe weather is in the area, it is important to understand things that take place and why they do. Below, you will find a helpful guide to better understand what goes on during a storm.

Storm Sirens
In Hamilton County, the outdoor warning sirens will sound a steady tone for five (5) minutes when there is a TORNADO WARNING. If you hear the sirens during a storm, this means that a tornado has been spotted or could develop within the area of the siren. TAKE PRECAUTIONS IMMEDIATELY!! It is strongly recommended to watch or listen to your local news for weather updates when the sirens are heard.
In addition, the sirens are tested in Hamilton County on the first Wednesday of each month at noon.

For more information about being prepared for storms and natural disasters, please click the link for the Hamilton County Emergency Management Agency at the link at the bottom of the page.

What goes on with the Rangers and Dispatch during a Severe Weather event

During any event that results in power outages, either to a residential street, neighborhood or community as a whole, there are a lot of things going on within the Police and Fire Departments that most people probably do not know or realize. Generally, if there are more than a couple of residents without power, the Police Department is aware, most likely on scene and has probably notified Duke Energy of the problem. The issues regarding the Police come as a result of multiple calls about the same situation. While we encourage our residents to call the Police for a problem, we do ask for patience and common sense in the event of a large scale power outage or large natural event. The set up that residents need to be aware of are as follows:

Any given shift can have 2-5 officers working the road and one dispatcher. The Indian Hill Rangers dispatch center has several phone lines that accept calls at the same time. However, during a situation that results in multiple calls, one person has to answer every call that is made into the Police Department. On top of that, the dispatcher has to monitor two radio channels used by the Police Department and if possible, several by the Fire Department. During all this, the dispatcher has to sort out the runs and dispatch them to the appropriate officer for a response. The dispatcher then has to process any request such as phone calls, notifying other agencies etc., made by the officers on the road. Long story short, an event can result in several hundred calls being made to the Police Department, for the same thing, which is handled by one person. Unfortunately, many times, the dispatcher nor the police officers are able to give precise answers to residents when they call.

When Duke Energy is called, neither the Rangers nor the Fire Department are told when the power will be restored. Many times when there is a large scale power outage, the Rangers receive hundreds of non-emergency calls about the power situation. Each call that is made to the Ranger station can slow response times to true emergencies. This not only affects the safety and security of residents, but of responding officers as well. It is important to remember that if your power is out, chances are other communities may be affected as well.

DURING A STORM OR NATURAL DISASTER, PLEASE LIMIT CALLS TO THE RANGERS FOR EMERGENCIES ONLY!!

Please use the following numbers to contact local utilities of service related issues to your residence:

  • Duke Energy - 1-800-544-6900
  • Alta Fiber - 513-565-2210
  • Spectrum - 513-489-5000

 

The Indian Hill Rangers

The Indian Hill Police Department is a twenty-five person department that serves the Village of Indian Hill. The village is located in eastern Hamilton County, approximately eight miles from downtown Cincinnati.

The department, which has a history that is rich in tradition and firsts, was established in 1903 as a private volunteer organization known as the “Indian Hill Horse Rangers”. The organization was financed and supported by wealthy landowners of the area. According to the original Ranger Charter (1903), the organization’s duty was “the mutual protection of the persons and property of its members, against the malicious and unlawful acts of marauders and depredators, and by concerted actions to discourage and make hazardous all such unlawful acts.” A new charter in 1910 changed the name of the organization to the Indian Hill Rangers, the moniker by which the department goes by today.

Once the Village of Indian Hill incorporated in 1941, the organization became a publicly financed police department. Its first chief, Col. Lynn Black, went on to become the first Superintendent of the Ohio State Highway Patrol. The department has always been fortunate to be well equipped. The Rangers had the first police radio, radar unit, and breathalyzer in southwest Ohio.

In 1985 the department became the first in Ohio and the sixth in the nation to be accredited by the Commission for Accreditation for Law Enforcement.

The department employs 21 sworn officers, four dispatchers and a civilian administrative assistant. The distribution among the ranks is as follows: 12 patrolmen, 4 lieutenants, 2 captains, two detectives and the chief of police. The patrol officers are separated into four squads, along with one dispatcher and a lieutenant as a first line supervisor.

The following are brief job descriptions for the various positions within the department:

The communications officers (dispatchers) serve as the initial departmental contact for all telephone or radio calls for service. They facilitate the flow of information necessary for the delivery of efficient, effective, and professional police services. Besides radio and telephone responsibilities, dispatchers are required to communicate and record pertinent information utilizing various computer programs. Finally, dispatchers are responsible to maintain a continuous presence at the front desk area providing assistance to the general public and other department visitors.

Patrol officers, as in any small department, are responsible for the usual array of duties. They provide preventative patrol, traffic control, response to emergencies, auto accident investigation, criminal investigation, and assistance to the public on a wide variety of calls for service.

The patrol lieutenants are actually first line supervisors in charge of a squad. They are responsible for the daily job performance of that squad. Lieutenants are responsible for all disciplinary issues within their squad. They are also responsible for promoting training, coaching, and career development of squad members.

The Captain of Investigations is responsible for managing all phases of the department’s operation of criminal investigations and/or special assignments. They investigate all major cases with the assistance of a detective.

The Captain of Patrol is responsible for the daily running of the patrol. All aspects of the department’s operation from patrol to records are inspected and approved by the captain prior to the chief’s final review.

Besides the general duties of each position, each officer including dispatchers and lieutenants are assigned what are referred to as “individual responsibilities”. Each officer is provided the training necessary to perform his or her individual responsibilities. The following is a comprehensive list of all the individual responsibilities:

  • Criminal Investigation Case Management
  • Emergency Response Plans
  • City of Indian Hill Emergency Operations Plan
  • School Critical Incident Plan
  • SWAT
  • Special Operations/Unusual Occurrences
  • Fitness Program
  • Background Investigations
  • Color Guard
  • Warrants
  • Selective Enforcement Program
  • Legal Officer Update
  • Firing Range Maintenance
  • Property Room
  • Vehicle and Equipment Maintenance
  • Departmental Inventory
  • Dispatch System Administrator
  • Departmental Historian
  • Records retention
  • Auto Crash reports/Crash Investigator
  • Burglary Alarm Files
  • School Liaison Officer
  • Intoxolizer
  • Crime Prevention Officer
  • Use of Force Training: Firearms, Less than lethal, Defense tactics
  • FTO Program
  • Uniforms
  • Crime Scene Processing/Evidence Collection

For each individual responsibility, the assigned officer is required to complete either a quarterly or biannual report to the Patrol Captain. These reports provide the captain with summaries of the activities for each responsibility. They will include relevant statistics, the progress or lack of progress of programs, recommendations for new programs, requests for budget items, and any other issue pertaining to the individual responsibility. Both the captains and the chief then review these reports making sure that the responsibilities are being performed to their expectations.

The department’s mission of being “Dedicated to Service, Committed to Excellence” is accomplished through an emphasis on community service. Although patrolling, responding to calls for service, and investigation are given the priority they deserve, community service commands a major emphasis of the department’s mission.

The Chief’s of Police

In February of 1903, a group of residents incorporated the Indian Hill Horse Rangers. The group was comprised of volunteers. In 1910, the Charter from the Ohio Secretary of State was changed to the Indian Hill “Rangers”.

By 1929, Indian Hill began to grow and develop into a suburban residential area with a need for a full-time professional police department. Sergeant Lynn Black was recruited from the West Virginia State Police for the job of Police Chief. On February 15, 1931, Sergeant Black resigned to head the newly formed Hamilton County Police Patrol and later left there to organize the Ohio State Highway Patrol.

Captain H.E. Wilson replaced Lynn Black as Chief of Police of the Rangers and remained Chief more than 25 years, until his retirment in 1958.

Colonel John H. Diekmeyer replaced Captain Wilson as Chief of Police in 1958 and remained Chief until his retirement in 1975 with forty years of service to the Village of Indian Hill.

Colonel William R. Barnett replaced Colonel Diekmeyer as Chief of the Rangers in 1975 and remained Chief until his retirement in 1982 with thirty-three years of service.

Colonel William C. Wiebold joined the Rangers in 1961 and replaced Colonel Barnett in 1982. He retired in 1995 after thirty-three years of service.

Colonel Larry H. Chadwell replaced Colonel Wiebold in 1995 and remained Chief until his retirment in 1999. Colonel Chadwell served Indian Hill for nearly twenty-five years.

Colonel Will McQueen replaced Colonel Chadwell in 1999. Colonel McQueen joined the Rangers in 1985 and retired in 2007 with twenty-one years of service to the village.

Colonel Chuck Schlie is the current Chief of the Rangers. He joined the Rangers in 1993 and replaced Colonel McQueen in 2007.

As the need grew, the strength of the Rangers increased from two full-time officers in 1929, to the present strength of twenty-five. Transforming from a non-profit volunteer association, to an efficient, well equipped and well staffed Police Department.

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With a population of around 6,087 people, it is technically a city but its life style over the years has remained constant, that of a quiet residential community. Indian Hill is located in Hamilton County, Ohio, just a few miles northeast of the City of Cincinnati.

Contact Us

6525 Drake Rd,
Cincinnati, OH 45243
(513) 561 - 6500

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